John Long Email to City & Metro

We are reaching out regarding the two people who have died over the weekend to ask if there is any way we can help in a follow-up investigation and in communication with the public. I know we are all feeling these personal tragedies. We are mourning for the families and friends of these two Houston people. Each of us sees ourselves, our loved ones, in their place and our hearts ache. BikeHouston has been following up with media and people with bicycles on these deaths as people are reaching out and asking why? We now turn to you all as leads in these areas for follow-up on the question of why these deaths happened — beyond the immediate answer of “You should never cross in front of the train.” What does an engineering and planning holistic review reveal? How can we improve planning and design to reduce exposure to risk? We must keep working to improve behavior and compliance to the law and we must also ask how we can change design to result in the behaviors that will keep people safe. Tom, we know METRO cares deeply about the safety of your passengers. We saw your quote in the Chronicle where you asked for time to do a review of the incidents. Thank-you for this. BikeHouston is ready to assist however we can, including communicating follow-up investigations to the public, as well as with education campaigns. Below are some the questions we have been asking and hearing from the bicycling community: Regarding the 610 crash: Why was a person riding a bike on the 610 feeder road? Can we...

Feb. 6th, 2017 – Press Release

For Immediate Release Feb. 6th, 2017 BikeHouston Contact: Mary Blitzer, Advocacy Director, mblitzer@bikehouston.org, 281-940-6139 There have been two deaths in three days. Marjorie Corcoran, a physics and astronomy professor at Rice University, was killed by the train as she crossed the tracks at Sunset Blvd. Another man, whose identify is not yet know publicly, was killed by the train while crossing at the 610 feeder road. Our hearts go out to the families and friends of these two people. These are two tragic reminders of why the Houston Bike Plan is so important. No deaths on our streets are acceptable. City Council must vote Yes and adopt the Bike Plan to make the streets of Houston safe for all people riding bicycles. The Bike Plan provides a toolbox for designing streets and intersections to create a safe bike network across town and it includes education programs. Following each death, the City should start an investigation asking: “Why did the death happen?” A full investigation should be done that includes, how could the designs of these roads and intersections be improved? Does an alternative route need to be provided? What were the human mistakes and how do we change the road design to make it harder for these mistakes to happen? The Bike Plan, which was begun in response to earlier deaths, is going to City Council next week. We cannot afford to delay. We ask council vote yes on the Bike...
A Word From Our Director

A Word From Our Director

What is BikeHouston doing today to make Houston more bike-friendly tomorrow? We’re working through the final details with the City of Houston to close the deal on the Bike Plan — aiming for approval of the plan by City Council as early as February 14th…and certainly by the Houston Bike Summit on February 27th.  Mayor Turner will speak at the Bike Summit and it is our hope that we can all celebrate with him the Plan’s passage. To build momentum behind this effort, and to counter the claims of the naysayers, we have been conducting a social media campaign on Instagram; using the hashtag #realpeopleridingbikes. We hope this shows it is not just “cyclists” who ride bikes. There are many kinds of people who ride for many different purposes.  That is what we are documenting with photos. You can help. Use your Instagram app to take a photo of you, your friends and your bikes. Tag it #realpeopleridingbikes and tag the mayor @sylvesterturner. I mentioned the Bike Summit above. Join us at St. Arnold’s Brewery February 27th (5:00 – 8:00 pm) for the first-ever Bike Summit. Mayor Turner and HPD Chief Art Acevedo will speak. Both of these leaders are in a position to influence cycling in Houston in very real ways. Pick up your tickets on the BikeHouston web page and come out to hear what they have to...
NEW Holman On-street Bikeway

NEW Holman On-street Bikeway

Introducing our newest on-street bikeway: Holman through midtown. In the spirit of remaining positive and celebrating small victories we want to introduce you to the Holman project. Holman connects under Spur 527 to Hawthorne through Montrose (also crossing Smith). Now we know the section under the spur isn’t what it should be and are working with Tx-DOT on this. We are working with Montrose District on Hawthorne improvements and through other partners to get it connected east through 3rd ward. And yes, the signs on Holman should read ‘bikes may use a full lane’ not ‘share the road’ but our disconnected pieces of bikeways are becoming a network bit by bit. BikeHouston is pushing for and celebrating each little improvement. Update – Email sent by BikeHouston – 2/7/2017 BikeHouston reached out to the Districts involved with this project to ensure some concerns are addressed early on. Email sent by BikeHouston – 10/1/2017 Link to Pictures Sent We will continue to update you on this project as it develops. You can see more pictures of the lane and intersections we are referring to HERE. You can help: join us as a member or...
Brian Barr, 21, Chemical Engineer Student

Brian Barr, 21, Chemical Engineer Student

Brian Barr, 21, chemical engineer student, works at Rice Bikes, the student-run bike shop at Rice University Brian moved to Houston three years ago to start his freshman year at Rice University. He came from Atlanta where he was not able to ride his bike that often because his neighborhood there was not very bike friendly. Luckily he could sometimes borrow the family car. Now a student at Rice, Brian has lost access to the car and finds his way on his bike or by taking public transit like buses and the metro rail. Houston is a 6: “I cannot afford a car, being a student at Rice is expensive enough, so having a bicycle is an essential part of my means of transportation. I am glad that I can use my bike around campus and that the lightrail is close by. Houston has a lot of potential as a bike friendly city because it is so flat and it stays warm throughout the year. Some neighborhoods are already very bike friendly and have easy access to off-street facilities such as the bayou trails, but other parts of the city still have a ways to go. For example if I need to go to the Galleria area or Greenway Plaza, although it is not far, I never take my bike. I do consider myself a strong and fearless cyclist. You have to be if you depend heavily on riding your bike for transportation. Overall right now I would give the city a 6 out of 10 but with the potential to be an 8 or a 9.” Houston Bike...

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